Put that phone down:  now It’s confirmed clicking selfies is a mental disorder

  Put that phone down:  now It’s confirmed

     clicking selfies is a mental disorder!

Whether you are on your casual morning jog, driving to work in a rush amid traffic, pushing your way through the queue at an eatery or enjoying a lazy weekend at a movie, at least one person around you is clicking a selfie if not you yourself. If your day ends without encountering a single selfie-clicking episode, either you were sleeping all day or were minding too much of your own business. That’s the kind of selfie-mania we are going through. Now that we have added selfies to our dictionaries already, is it time we add selfiemania too?

selfie

Selfitis now a medical condition

A recent study that was conducted in India has affirmed that clicking selfies is actually a medical condition that may require treatment. The condition is being called selfitis and they have also developed the ‘Selfitis Behaviour Scale’ that can help determine the severity of one’s addiction.

The findings of the study were published in International Journal of Mental Health. It classified the condition of selfitis in three levels. First, borderline, that is clicking at least three selfies a day but not posting it on social media. Second, acute, that is clicking at least three selfies a day but posting it on social media. Third, chronic, that is a constant urge to click selfies and posting at least six on social media.

India ranks number one when it comes to accidents related to selfies. The country accounts for almost 60 per cent of the total selfie accidents that happen throughout the world. And yet, sadly, the fact isn’t enough to drive people away from this banefulness.

The obsession of clicking selfies is driven from one’s psychological condition, any deficits or surpluses of emotion. To understand why the millennials are going crazy about the front cameras of their phones, we talked to Dr JR Ram, consultant psychiatrist, Apollo Gleneagles Hospitals, Kolkata, Dr Vasantha R Patri, chairperson, psychologist, Indian Institute of Counselling and Nitika Kumar, a counselling psychologist and a research scholar at University of Delhi.

I have been there, I have done that” – The need to demonstrate

However, when it comes to driving to insane heights for a selfie that can be life-risking, it is about people trying to demonstrate a “face of themselves they wish to present to the world,” said Nitika. For Dr Vasantha, the primary reason of the rising selfie accidents in India is that people now want to show to the world that they have achieved a milestone that none or only a few others have achieved. People are constantly looking for appreciation from others, said Dr Ram. They demonstrate their accomplishments to look daring, bold and different and this in turn gets them attention. “The more daring your selfie is, the more likely you are to be noticed and appreciated by your peers. It’s a face that would give them instant approval of their peers,” said Nitika.

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